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437 Tales in All

The Coloured Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's Fairy Books of Many Colors was a series of twelve collections of fairy tales that were published between 1889 and 1910. In the whole collection there were 43 tales which came from all countries and cultures.

Extremely Popular

The series became immensely popular, and was a great influence in Children's Literature, increasing the popularity of fairy tales over real life stories. The stories also influenced the creation of many Disney stories and movies that were produced years later.

12 Books

Blue Fairy Book (1889) - The first volume in Lang's fairy tale series features some of the finest stories from around the world, most of them old favorites: 37 in all including "Sleeping Beauty," "Rumpelstiltskin," "Cinderella," "The Arabian Nights," "Beauty and the Beast," "Hansel and Gretel," "Jack the Giantkiller," and "Puss in Boots."
Red Fairy Book (1890)- The famed folklorist collects 37 tales of enchantment, ranging from the familiar ("Rapunzel," "Jack and the Beanstalk," and "The Golden Goose") to lesser-known stories ("The Voice of Death," "The Enchanted Pig," and "The Master Thief"). Sources include French, Russian, Danish, and Romanian tales as well as Norse mythology.
Green Fairy Book (1892) - Giants, dwarfs, monsters, and magicians star in 42 classic stories from China, Russia, Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Scotland, and England. Includes "The Three Little Pigs" and "The Half-Chick."
Yellow Fairy Book (1894) - American Indian, Russian, German, Icelandic, French, and other stories — 48 in all — among them "The Tinder-box," "The Nightingale," and "How to Tell a True Princess."
Pink Fairy Book (1897) - Forty-one Japanese, Scandinavian, and Sicilian tales: "The Snow-Queen," "The Cunning Shoemaker," "The Two Brothers," "The Merry Wives," "The Man without a Heart," and more. All the stories are narrated in the clear, lively prose for which Lang was famous and are considered to be the very best English versions available.
Grey Fairy Book (1900) - Thirty-five stories, many from oral traditions, and others from French, German, Italian collections, but all told in the common language of the fairy tale. Includes "The Goat-faced Girl," "The Sunchild," "The Street Musicians," "The Twin Brothers," "Prunella," and many more filled with giants, magicians, fairies, ogres, and other fantastic creatures.
Violet Fairy Book (1901) - Roumania, Japan, Serbia, Lithuania, Africa, Portugal, and Russia are among the sources of these 35 stories that tell of a haunted forest, chests of gold coins, a magical dog, and a man who outwits a dragon. Perhaps the best English versions available of these classic stories.
Crimson Fairy Book (1903) - One of England's top folklorists presents another volume in his much-loved "rainbow" series of fairy books. These 36 stories originated in Hungary, Russia, Finland, Iceland, Tunisia, the Baltic, and elsewhere. They include "The Cottager and His Cat," "The Crab and the Monkey," "Little Wildrose," "The Gold-bearded Man," and others.
Brown Fairy Book (1904) - 32 less familiar folk tales from the American Indians, Australian Bushmen, African Kaffirs, and from Persia, Lapland, Brazil, and India. Different enough to capture all imaginations.
Orange Fairy Book (1906) - 33 tales from Jutland, Rhodesia, Uganda, and various other European traditions: "The Magic Mirror," "The Two Caskets," "The Clever Cat," "The White Slipper," "The Girl-Fish, and more."
Olive Fairy Book (1907) - Eight Punjabi tales, five from Armenia, 16 others. An enchanting world of flying dragons, ogres, fairies, and princes transformed into white foxes.
Lilac Fairy Book (1910) - Over 30 tales from Portugal, Ireland, Wales, and points East and West, among them "The Brown Bear of Norway," "The Enchanted Deer," "The Story of a Very Bad Boy," and "The Brownie of the Lake."